RailTasmania.com

From a contemporary newspaper:<br>

This is the story of the death of three old trains<br>
Their names are Q-6, Q-14 and Q-15 and they are very old and tired.<br>
The oldest of the proud black trio of iron horses is Q-6.<br>
She was born at the Perry Engineering works in Adelaide in 1923 and until her retirement several years ago logged a million miles.<br>
Next is Q-15, who logged 616,000 miles. Q-14s tally is a mere 600,000. These two were built by Clyde Engineering, Sydney in 1937.<br>
Yesterday, the three trains were towed from the Invermay railway yards to Rocherlea by a diesel locomotive - with a steam train called H-6 pushing. <br>
The three Qs looked a forlorn sight as they went to their graveyard. <br>
Their fires were out but they still managed to make a sad train like sound as the air was forced through their engines by the pistons.<br>
There was no steam, no smoke and their old wheels squeaked and groaned a little as they trundled across railway lines for the last time.<br>
Waiting at Rocherlea Station, oxy-acetylene cutting equipment at the ready was Mr. J. McNamara, of Melbourne, and two workmen, who will break-up the old trains into pieces to be shipped to Formosa. <br>
In Formosa Q-6, Q-14 and Q-15 will be melted down into sheets of shiny new steel. <br>
And from there? <br>
They will be shipped back to Australia to be used for machinery, a ship or maybe new diesel train
From a contemporary newspaper:
This is the story of the death of three old trains
Their names are Q-6, Q-14 and Q-15 and they are very old and tired.
The oldest of the proud black trio of "iron horses" is Q-6.
She was "born" at the Perry Engineering works in Adelaide in 1923 and until her retirement several years ago logged a million miles.
Next is Q-15, who logged 616,000 miles. Q-14's tally is a mere 600,000. These two were built by Clyde Engineering, Sydney in 1937.
Yesterday, the three trains were towed from the Invermay railway yards to Rocherlea by a diesel locomotive - with a steam train called H-6 pushing.
The three "Qs" looked a forlorn sight as they went to their "graveyard".
Their fires were out but they still managed to make a sad train like sound as the air was forced through their engines by the pistons.
There was no steam, no smoke and their old wheels squeaked and groaned a little as they trundled across railway lines for the last time.
Waiting at Rocherlea Station, oxy-acetylene cutting equipment at the ready was Mr. J. McNamara, of Melbourne, and two workmen, who will break-up the old trains into pieces to be shipped to Formosa.
In Formosa Q-6, Q-14 and Q-15 will be melted down into sheets of shiny new steel.
And from there?
They will be shipped back to Australia to be used for machinery, a ship or maybe new diesel train
Photographer: Dennis Camplin collection


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